Year 9hibs English

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Some of the worksheets for this concept are Year 9, Year 9 english, Year 8 grammar booklet 1 and tasks, Spelling list for years 9 10 high school, Could i live smaller year 9, Year 1 entry into year 2 25 hour revision booklet english, Edexcel international lower secondary curriculum english, Year 4 entry into year 5 25 hour revision booklet english.

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Year 9
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Here is a list of English skills students learn in year 9! These skills are organised into categories, and you can move your mouse over any skill name to preview the skill. To start practising, just click on any link. IXL will track your score, and the questions will automatically increase in difficulty as you improve! HIBS ENGLISH: Home Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Year 12 Year 13 Debating Proudly powered by Weebly. University of Texas Austin - Cactus Yearbook (Austin, TX), Class of 1975, Cover E-Yearbook.com has the largest online yearbook collection of college, university, high school, middle school, junior high school, military, naval cruise books and yearbooks.

Year 9 English
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Year 8 Grammar Booklet 1 and tasks -
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Spelling List for Years 9 10 (high school)
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Could I live smaller? (Year 9) -
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Year 1 (Entry into Year 2) 25 Hour Revision Booklet English
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Edexcel International Lower Secondary Curriculum English
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Year 4 (Entry into Year 5) 25 Hour Revision Booklet English
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Year 9hibs English

During the year, students will cover 6 topic areas as outlined in the Year 9 Course Outline in Canvas Modules>>

Year 9hibs English Dub

  1. Personal reflective writing
  2. Analytical, Expository or persuasive writing
  3. Short stories: reading, analysis and creating original short story
  4. Poetry: reading, analysis and performance
  5. Twelfth Night: analytical essay writing
  6. Twelfth Night: short oral and written responses comparing the play and film adaptations.

Students can check the CATs (assessment tasks) and dates in Canvas>>

English teachers can access course information in OneDrive>>

The Year 9 English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, (knowing about the English language) literature (understanding, appreciating, responding to, analysing and creating literature) and literacy (expanding the repertoire of English usage). Teaching and learning programs balance and integrate all three strands. Together the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier levels, and teachers revisit and strengthen these as needed.

At Year 9 students continue to practise, consolidate and extend what they have learned from previous levels. They also extend their understanding of how language works, and learn to transfer this knowledge to different contexts. To achieve this, students develop an understanding of the requirements of different types of texts; they are introduced to increasingly sophisticated analyses of various kinds of literary, popular culture, and everyday texts, and they are given opportunities to engage with the technical aspects of texts, including those of their own choosing – and to explain why they made that choice.

The notion of valuing certain texts as ‘literature’ is introduced. Students learn how such texts can be discussed and analysed in relation to themes, ideas and historical and cultural contexts. Students engage with a variety of genres and modes. They re-enact, represent and describe texts in order to display their understanding of narrative, theme, purpose, context and argument and to defend their ideas in written and oral modes. Students are given further opportunities to create increasingly sophisticated and multimodal texts in groups and individually.

Although Australia is a linguistically and culturally diverse country, participation in many aspects of Australian life depends on effective communication in Standard Australian English. In addition, proficiency in English is invaluable globally. The English curriculum contributes both to nation-building and to internationalisation, including Australia’s links to Asia. English also helps students to engage imaginatively and critically with literature to expand the scope of their experience. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have contributed to Australian society and to its contemporary literature and literary heritage through their distinctive ways of representing and communicating knowledge, traditions and experience.

The Year 9 English course is structured around two ‘big ideas’: ‘exploring and reflecting’ and ‘creating and consolidating’. Through their study and exploration of a range of texts (including a close study of one novel and one Shakespearean play), both units encourage students to reflect upon the human condition and thereby recognise and value the diversity of social and cultural backgrounds and opinions (including marginalised ‘voices’) within our community as well as nationally and globally. By exploring a range of ideas and issues from their in-depth analysis of texts and film, they consolidate their understandings through the creation and presentation of their own original written and multimodal texts. Both units focus on creative self-expression through speaking and listening in a variety of contexts, creative and formal writing, analysis of issues, analytical and persuasive essays, and creating and performing original poetry.

To meet the expected Year 9 achievement standards, throughout Year 9, students will be involved in reading, viewing, listening, writing, creating, comparing, researching, problem solving, reflecting and talking about a range of text types, including intercultural texts. The study of language (e.g. grammar, punctuation, syntax) is integrated across all areas of study. Students learning throughout the year includes the study of:

  • effective oral communication and active and critical listening
  • selected short stories; creating an original short story within a selected genre
  • selected poetry; creating original poetry; performing poetry
  • one Shakespearean play and its film adaptation
  • different forms of media text types, including advertising
  • how language is created by writers and speakers to influence and persuade in different contexts for different purposes and audiences
  • fiction and non-fiction texts through the wide-reading program, Literature Circles,

Students demonstrate their achievement against the standards of reading, writing, speaking and listening, and from all four learning areas and capabilities of critical and creative thinking, ethical, intercultural, and personal and social capabilitie (which are described below).

Students are set both short and long term assignments which require drafting and revision; tasks are undertaken during class time with homework spent preparing and polishing the task. Parents are encouraged to assist their son to develop sound study habits by regularly monitoring their work and in particular, noting when work is due. To assist in this process, assignments are accompanied by checklist and progress record sheets. Students may not necessarily have nightly English homework due the following day, but they will often have an on-going assignment to work on, and they are expected to regularly engage in nightly wide-reading.

Therefore, the study of English helps our students develop the knowledge and skills needed for VCE, training and the workplace. It helps them become ethical, thoughtful, informed and active members of society and plays an important part in developing the understanding, attitudes and capabilities of those who will take responsibility for Australia’s future.

This study is designed to enable students to develop:

  • ability to speak, listen, read, view, write create and reflect on increasingly complex and sophisticated spoken, written and multimodal texts with enjoyment, purpose, effect and confidence in a wide range of contexts
  • knowledge of the ways in which language varies according to context, purpose, audience and content, and the capacity to apply this knowledge
  • appreciate, enjoy and use the English language in all its variations and develop a sense of its richness and power to evoke feelings, convey information, form ideas, facilitate interaction with others, entertain, persuade and argue
  • knowledge of the linguistic patterns used to construct different texts, and the capacity to apply this knowledge, in writing and speaking
  • ability to discuss and analyse texts and language critically; and relate knowledge to aspects of contemporary society and personal experience
  • knowledge of the ways textual interpretation and understanding may vary according to cultural, social and personal differences, and the capacity to develop reasoned arguments about interpretation and meaning.
The study of English is organised around three language modes:

Reading and Viewing
Reading and Viewing involves students understanding, interpreting, critically analysing, reflecting upon, and enjoying written and visual, print and non-print texts. It encompasses reading and viewing a wide range of texts and media, including literary texts. Reading involves active engagement with texts and the development of knowledge about the relationship between them and the contexts in which they are created. It also involves the development of knowledge about a range of strategies for reading.
Click here to view the key skills students are expected to learn and develop at Year 9.

Writing
Writing involves students in the active process of conceiving, planning, composing, editing and publishing a range of texts. Writing involves using appropriate language for particular purposes or occasions, both formal and informal, to express and represent ideas and experiences, and to reflect on these aspects. It involves the development of knowledge about strategies for writing and the conventions of Standard Australian English. Students develop a metalanguage to discuss language conventions and use.
Click here to view the key skills students are expected to learn and develop at Year 9.

Speaking and Listening
Speaking and Listening refers to the various formal and informal ways oral language is used to convey and receive meaning. It involves the development and demonstration of knowledge about the appropriate oral language for particular audiences and occasions, including body language and voice. It also involves the development of active-listening strategies and an understanding of the conventions of different spoken texts.
Click here to view the key skills students are expected to learn and develop at Year 9.

Content Structure
The Year 9 English curriculum is organised into three interrelated strands that support students' growing understanding and use of Standard Australian English. Together the three strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking and writing. The three strands are:

Language: knowing about the English language
Literature: understanding, appreciating, responding to, analysing and creating literature
Literacy: expanding the repertoire of English usage.

Each strand is grouped into sub-strands that, across the year levels, present a sequence of development of knowledge, understanding and skills. The sub-strands are:

LanguageLiteratureLiteracy
Language variation and changeLiterature and contextTexts in context
Language for interactionResponding to literatureInteracting with others
Text structure and organisationExamining literatureInterpreting, analysing and evaluating
Expressing and developing ideasCreating literatureCreating texts
Sound and letter knowledge

Each strand contributes to the study of Year 9 English its own distinctive goals, body of knowledge, history of ideas and interests, and each relates to material worth studying in its own right. Teaching, learning and assessment programs balance and integrate the three strands in order to support the development of knowledge, understanding and skills. The key focal point for a unit of work or a learning activity may arise from any one of the strands, but the intention is that units and activities draw on all three strands in ways that are integrated and clear to learners.

Level 9 English Achievement Standard

The Level 9 achievement standards indicate the quality of learning students should typically demonstrate by the end of Year 9.

Year 9hibs English Subtitle

An achievement standard describes the quality of learning (the extent of knowledge, the depth of understanding and the sophistication of skills) that would indicate the student is well placed to commence the learning required at the next level of achievement.

Reading and viewing

  • analyse the ways that text structures can be manipulated for effect
  • analyse and explain how images, vocabulary choices and language features distinguish the work of individual authors
  • evaluate and integrate ideas and information from texts to form their own interpretations
  • select evidence from the text to analyse and explain how language choices and conventions are used to influence an audience

To achieve these standards, students are expected to have demonstrated, through their coursework and assessment tasks, development of knowledge, understanding and skills in the mode of reading and viewing.

Writing

  • understand how to use a variety of language features to create different levels of meaning
  • understand how interpretations can vary by comparing their responses to texts to the responses of others
  • in creating texts, demonstrate how manipulating language features and images can create innovative texts
  • create texts that respond to issues interpreting and integrating ideas from other texts
  • edit for effect, selecting vocabulary and grammar that contribute to the precision and persuasiveness of texts and using accurate spelling and punctuation

To achieve these standards, students are expected to have demonstrated, through their coursework and assessment tasks, development of knowledge, understanding and skills in the mode of writing.

Speaking and Listening

  • understand how to use a variety of language features to create different levels of meaning
  • understand how interpretations can vary by comparing their responses to texts to the responses of others
  • in creating texts, demonstrate how manipulating language features and images can create innovative texts
  • create texts that respond to issues, interpreting and integrating ideas from texts
  • make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, comparing and evaluating responses to ideas and issues

Year 9hibs English Translation

To achieve these standards, students are expected to have demonstrated, through their coursework and assessment tasks, development of knowledge, understanding and skills in the mode of speaking and listening.

Year 9hibs English Subtitles

Achievement is also demonstrated through the integrated cross-curriculum capabilties in the four areas of critical and creative thinking, ethical, intercultural, and personal and social capabilities.

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